Mostly Better

It’s been a week. My last entry happened on a day when I had more than 20 seizures. I’ve learned that if I’m that incapacitated by seizures, I’m definitely having an MS relapse. I called my neurologist to follow up, and he called in a medrol dose pack on Friday afternoon. The effect was damn near instant. Thursday: 20+ seizures, Friday prior to meds: 13 seizures (I took the first day’s worth after dinner), Saturday: 0 seizures. NONE. Not one.

I wish I could say that I haven’t had any since Saturday, but that wouldn’t be true. Yesterday I had a couple, but they were simple partials (facial twitches), so I’m not worried about them. I’ve come to the point in my experience having seizure disorder where 1-2 simple partial seizures a day doesn’t feel like any big deal to me at all. Today, so far, I’m good. Maybe that means that tomorrow I can get back to the gym. I’d really like that.

Doing The Right Thing

Sometimes, I do the right thing without even realizing that I’m doing it. It always makes me smile when that happens. Take that letter that I wrote myself last week, for example. Apparently, science has proven that writing yourself compassionate letters is good for your mental health. It stops you from ruminating on the negative and allows you to take positive action. (Like taking a much-needed nap!)

Today, I’m doing my best not to ruminate on an irrational concept that a friend brought up in reference to herself. She said that she didn’t want to live a mediocre life.

A Mediocre Life? There’s No Such Thing.

For whatever reason, reading the phrase “living a mediocre life” felt like a punch in the chest. The idea that I might be living what she considered to be a mediocre life stuck in my craw. What upset me worse was the idea that I might think that I’m living a mediocre life.

I mean, I spend most of my days alone in an apartment, doing household chores and participating on social media.  It’s not exactly the stuff of legend.  Back in the day, before seizures, I used to be much more social and was very career-driven. But does a change from that way of being mean that my life is second-rate or ordinary? Since when has anything about me been ordinary?

Truth be told, I spent a significant amount of time in therapy wrestling with the question of why I’m even alive, if I’m not doing anything important. The answer to that question was remarkably simple: Because it’s better than the alternative! And, besides, how am I supposed to accurately know what is or isn’t “important” in the grand scheme of Life, The Universe, and Everything? That requires a level of objectivity that no human can possibly attain.

So, sure, I’m not living life the way that I had hoped for myself. So what? What person living with a chronic illness is? Hell, I’d go so far as to wager that no one is! We all deal with shit being thrown at us that we neither expected nor wanted, and we deal with it. Does living a life that is different from the one “of my dreams” mean that my life is inferior, insignificant, or of poor quality?  No, it doesn’t.

Just Because You’re Not Living The Life Of Your Dreams Doesn’t Mean You’re Not Living Well.

There’s so much pressure in our society to stand out and be considered important, and it’s totally unnecessary. It comes from our constant consumption of narratives: TV shows and movies and books. And most of these narratives are fictitious. In real life, we’re each the protagonist of our own story, but none of us knows the whole story because it’s constantly unfolding before us.

Hell, the US military even capitalized on this idea by asking the question, “If your life was a story, would anybody read it?” in recruitment ads. It’s such a silly way of thinking. Comparing stories from our lives with other people’s stories based on entertainment value is fruitless. It’s a directive for misery. There will always be people who have it better and those who have it worse. There will always be people achieving more and those who aspire to far less.

I mean, let’s take a step back from the question of “Is my life mediocre?” and ask an even more important question: who’s judging? Society? The media? History? Why should I care what anyone (other than me) thinks of my life? I’m the one living it, and I’m proud of who I am. That’s what studying Tao is all about: the idea that your path is unique to you, and that you can’t do life wrong.

If we must put ourselves up for judgment, I think it’s better to focus on a set of objective metrics.

  1. Do you do something to learn and grow as a person every day?
  2. Do you engage in activities that contribute positively to your community, such as philanthropy, charity, or advocacy?
  3. Do you treat yourself and others with kindness, compassion, and respect?
  4. Do you make an effort to use your unique talents when you’re able to?
  5. Do you take time to express gratitude and to appreciate the people and things in your life?
  6. Do you share your knowledge with others? Everybody knows something you don’t! It’s one of humanity’s greatest gifts!
  7. Do you make an effort to be empathetic and honor the experiences of others?

I think that if you can say “yes” to those questions, then you’re living a life you can be proud of.  And to be honest, even if you can’t answer “yes” to all of them, it doesn’t mean that your life is mediocre.
 

Shake It Off

Today’s earbug is a pop song by Taylor Swift. I usually don’t like her music, but I’ve had this song stuck in my head for a few days, and it works with the theme of today’s post. I hope it makes you want to shake your booty too.

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A Letter to Myself

Hey, Rae.

You’re having a tough day today. You’ve already had so many seizures that you’ve lost count. You barely have enough energy to get up and do things, but you’re still trying your hardest. You’ve put up some laundry, made the bed, and most importantly, you called your neurologist to request medicine.

Having seizures is no fun. They mess with your memory and perception of time. They mess with your motivation. They mess with your ability to be the kind of person that you want to be. Please, don’t ever let them stop you from trying to be that person anyway.

I’m not sure, when you start having multiple seizures per day and are getting tingles on your back and feet and left side, why you don’t immediately call the doctor to ask for medication, but you don’t. Ok, that’s not entirely true. I know you cling to the hope that it’ll pass. You reason to yourself that you’re either overheated somehow or are fighting off an infection that you don’t know about. The most treacherous part of regularly having pseudoexacerbations is not that they occur, but that you can never trust your body to let you know when what you’re feeling is not a pseudoexacerbation, but a real relapse. Pseudoexacerbations rob you of your ability to trust yourself. Keep listening to your body anyway.

Today, it’s a beautiful day. It’s mostly sunny and a perfect 68 degrees outside. I know you desperately want to get up and walk the dog and then walk to and from the grocery store to make some kind of delicious dinner in the slow cooker, but your body is telling you that you really shouldn’t try to do that, for your own safety, and you’re angry about it. It sucks! Nobody wants to be trapped indoors by their body.

But remember, it’s not always like this. There will be days when you can do 45 minutes of cardio as well as weightlifting at the gym. Just not today. Today is about exercising self-compassion and resting.

I hear you, raging in the same brain that is writing this letter. I hear you crying and screaming about how this is all terribly unfair, and you’re absolutely right. It is! There is nothing fair about multiple sclerosis. And that’s okay. Life’s not fair. We all do the best we can with the life we’ve got.

Even though I know you want to get up and do a million different things – putting up the dishes, folding the laundry, cooking something for lunch, washing out the bathtub, or any of the other things you keep fixating on, like practicing yoga, playing guitar, or learning to sew… I’m telling you to take a nap. I don’t care that you only woke up 3 hours ago. You’re tired. You’re so tired you can barely keep your eyes open as you type this. Please stop pushing yourself so hard and being so mean to yourself about what you’re unable to accomplish. It’s not helpful. It doesn’t make you feel good, and it doesn’t accomplish anything productive.

Thank you for letting me write this letter. I know it’s weird and embarrassing to be publishing something like this to the public, but maybe someone else needs to hear the same things you do… so I’m saying them.

You don’t have to compare yourself to anyone else. They’re walking their path. You’re walking yours. Just do the best job of taking care of yourself that you can. That’s all anyone who loves you actually wants from you.

The Irony Is Not Lost On Me.

In the wake of Robin Williams’ death, I’ve been talking with a lot of my friends about the topic of suicide.

Suicidal Thinking: I know a little about it…

suicideThe first time I tried to kill myself, I was very young. I want to say I was 8. I might have been 9. I was in 3rd grade. I had been through some shit. I took double the adult dosage of some cough syrup. (What can I say? As a kid, I didn’t understand how it worked.) To my surprise, I didn’t die. I did, however, faint, and get to deal with EMTs. I actually was glad I lived, but I never stopped thinking about it. Any time I was down on myself or dealing with bullies, it seemed like the natural, appropriate answer to the situation. It wasn’t.

In early 2003, at the age of 22, I walked into Lakeside and said, “I need help. I can’t stop thinking about killing myself.” The week that followed was horrifying, but helpful. They put me in a room with an anorexic lady who stole my down jacket so that she could sweat off more weight, and I actually had to spend a significant amount of time in group therapy with the very woman who had abused me as a kid at child care and convinced me that I was nothing more than a burden to my parents.

In a very everything-happens-for-a-reason sort of way, I learned all about the abuse she suffered as a child and her messed up reasoning for abusing me. Turns out, I was actually her favorite child from day care, ever. At the time, she was unmedicated, undiagnosed, and suffering from schizophrenia. She genuinely believed that she was trying to teach me necessary life skills and the reality of the world we are living in. Abusers often don’t understand that what they’re doing is harmful because they’re repeating a cycle from their own lives. So, I had to forgive her, in front of a group of strangers, so she could begin to forgive herself. She had been red-banded (a red wrist band told hospital workers not to allow her outside or near anything she could use to harm herself) for more than 6 months. In contrast, I was red-banded for 2 of my 5 days.

The second time I was hospitalized thanks to suicide was 7 years later. Even after going through EMDR therapy to help stop seizures and deal with trauma from earlier in life (much of which I have intentionally kept off this blog), I genuinely believed that I was nothing more than a burden to my family and friends. In the course of 2 years, I had gone from being a socially adventurous academic overachiever to someone who had seizures almost all day long, every day, who couldn’t work and spent all of her days either on the couch or in bed.

suicide2When my parents suddenly let me know that they could no longer help us with rent, Adam and I faced an immediate choice between heading to a homeless shelter and leaving the Los Angeles area to move in with his brother in Romeoville, IL. Either way, we would lose most of our possessions and pride. I felt entirely responsible for our situation, regardless of the facts that Adam had been unemployed for 2 years thanks to the recession and I had no control over having MS or a seizure disorder. I simply wasn’t willing to pull Adam down any further, and I could no longer handle my shame.

I was put on a 72-hour mandatory hold at Glendale Adventist after he called the police because I walked directly into traffic on a busy street. It was the most loving thing anyone has ever done for me, and it helped transform my life. It was there that I learned the truthful phrase, “Suicide is a liar demon.”

I wish I could say that my fight against suicidal thinking ended in that hospital, but it didn’t. It did, however, jump-start some better behaviors, like using aromatherapy to help keep you in the present moment. Unfortunately, I still couldn’t cope with the fact that I’d failed the CA bar exam twice (and wasted $20,000 in the process) or that I still couldn’t magically make myself better enough to be able to work.

It wasn’t until January of 2013, when I started working with a cognitive behavioral therapist to really break the cycle of suicide addiction, that I learned how to stop suicidal thinking in its tracks. It’s probably the most valuable set of rituals I’ve ever learned.

How I Kick Suicidal Thinking’s Sorry Ass Every Single Day

behappyThe best advice I got from CBT was to keep busy. My therapist often said, “An idle mind is the devil’s playground.” But just keeping busy doesn’t get the job done. It only helps distract you from your thoughts so you can get a word in edgewise with your thoughts. You still have to be pro-active. You still have to recognize when you have irrational thoughts and fight them. And any suicidal thought is irrational. Trust me on this one.

Here’s what I do to keep suicidal thoughts at bay:

1.) Every morning, I list 3 Great Things About Yesterday to remember the good that happened in the past and trick my brain into forgetting about or at least not focusing on the bad. Sometimes I write it here. Sometimes I write it on Facebook. Sometimes, I write in a real paper journal.

2.) Daily gratitude rampages help me focus on what’s good in the moment. Most of mine are in the journal, but sometimes I do them here or on Facebook.

3.) Daily meditation helps me focus my intentions. Right now, Chopra Center has a free 21-day meditation challenge going on, if you want some guidance to start your practice.

4.) I am constantly examining my thoughts for truth to figure out what’s real and what’s an ANT (automatic negative thought). If I find out that a thought is an ANT, I challenge it. It’s like running virus protection for your mind.

5.) Move! Even if you only take a 5-10 minute walk a day or do a few minutes of chair yoga because your legs don’t want to cooperate, getting your body in motion makes a huge difference in your ability to be happy.

When I started these practices, they were very difficult and a constant pain in the ass, but so was enduring life! Nowadays, they’re usually easy, quick, and enjoyable.

Rest In Peace, Mr. Williams.

robinwilliamsI have to say though, that I wouldn’t have written any of this if not for the fact that Robin Williams choked himself to death with a belt.

This guy — this actor/comedian whose roles were so intensely life-affirming that I watched many of them (especially Robots, Dead Poets Society, Good Will Hunting, and Hook) multiple times while fighting suicidal ideation — he did the world a horrible favor by dying this way. He brought suicide into popular consciousness in the worst imaginable way — by being the very last person anyone would have expected to do it. The irony is not lost on me.

Robin Williams got us talking about how international fame, ludicrous amounts money, and talent-without-match are absolutely fucking meaningless when you’re dealing with addiction and suicidal thoughts. He reminded us that just because someone is smiling doesn’t mean they’re okay. He reminded us that actors can completely miss the messages for which they’re so loved. It’s profoundly sad.

Here are my favorite quotes from his incredible body of work:

Sean Maguire in Good Will Hunting: “You’ll have bad times, but it’ll always wake you up to the good stuff you weren’t paying attention to.”

Armand Goldman in The Birdcage: “So what? The important thing to remember is not to go to pieces when that happens. You have to react like a man, calmly. You have to say to yourself, ‘Albert, you pierced the toast, so what? It’s not the end of your life.’”

Fender in Robots: “You know Rodney, even if you know you had an discouraging day, remember. There is another one coming tomorrow!”

Genie in Aladdin: “To be my own master. Such a thing would be greater than all the magic and all the treasures in all the world.”

Peter Banning in Hook: “To live… to live would be an awfully big adventure.”

John Keating in Dead Poets Society: “They’re not that different from you, are they? Same haircuts. Full of hormones, just like you. Invincible, just like you feel. The world is their oyster. They believe they’re destined for great things, just like many of you, their eyes are full of hope, just like you. Did they wait until it was too late to make from their lives even one iota of what they were capable? Because, you see gentlemen, these boys are now fertilizing daffodils. But if you listen real close, you can hear them whisper their legacy to you. Go on, lean in. Listen, you hear it? – – Carpe – – hear it? – – Carpe, carpe diem, seize the day boys, make your lives extraordinary.”

The fact that I posted a “Carpe Diem” graphic yesterday felt like a kick in the gut. It deserves repeating.

carpediem

Life and things.

It seems like every time I start to do daily updates, something happens that knocks me off my game within a week. Don’t worry — no promises this time about being “better” or any of that garbage. I’m just gonna keep writing when it feels right and I have time. I figure y’all will appreciate quality over quantity.

The Great Housing Hunt of 2014 Continues.

nohouseSo, first thing to update you on – the house. We got to experience deja vu! A bidder came in with a cash offer, and we lost the property again. Adam and I actually have a bet going as to whether or not this bidder will pull out just like the last one did when they realize that the property has 2 PINs and thus has double the taxes they were expecting to pay. We figure we’ll just keep looking. If it comes back up, cool. If not, whatever.

In the meantime, I’m just enjoying our apartment and am doing my best to take advantage of its perks, like proximity to certain friends, easy bus access to get pretty much wherever I want to go, and having a Walgreens and 2 good grocery stores close enough that we can get to them with fewer than 5 minutes of walking.

Shaken, not Stirred

Every time I see "seize the day," all I think about is crossing out the word "the" and replacing it with the word "all."

Every time I see “seize the day,” all I think is about crossing out the word “the” and replacing it with the word “all.”

As for my health, things are super annoying right now. I miss being on birth control and having my hormones balanced by them. I’m having a ton more seizures than I used to, but it’s not an every day thing… just most days. And truthfully, it’s not something that lasts the whole day either. I’m just back to having to really question my ok-ness before I do things.

Fortunately, despite having seizures in the morning, I was able to visit with friends on Saturday night who had just had their second child earlier in the week. I didn’t want to go over to their house if I was seizing because I wanted the opportunity to actually hold their son and not have everyone worry. That’s actually why we waited until Saturday instead of visiting them on Friday night.

There’s a sort of inexplicable joy that comes from the knowledge that I can hold a kid without them being in danger. Truthfully, one of my bigger fears about becoming a mother has been whether or not my kids will be safe with me. I’m incredibly glad that I’ve learned when I need to put on a cold pack or lie down. It’s an important bit of knowledge to have.

She’s c-cold as ice.

cool58vestSpeaking of cold packs, I’ve finally made a decision as to what cooling vest I’m gonna buy. I’m ordering the Cool58 Secrets Vest. I decided on it because it’s supposed to keep you cool for 2-3 hours and the cold packs it uses don’t require a freezer to reactivate. This means, if I’m out for more than 3 hours and need to get them cold again, I can put them in cold water and they’ll be good to go again. I also was happy to see that you can purchase the Cool58 packs without a vest, which means if I end up wanting to create a different vest design later, I can still use the same cold packs.

And now, for a bit of the Awesome.

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3 Great Things About Yesterday

  1. Tried a Rainbow Cone for the first time.
  2. Got the first Dirk Gently book. Life is always better with a little Douglas Adams in it.
  3. Enjoyed the 3rd to last new TrueBlood episode ever.

Daily Cute

Can any species defy the affection of a baby kitten? I don’t think so.

Everyday Earbug
Today’s video makes me smile on a personal level, not just because it makes me want to shake my booty, but because they have a sorority in it called “Electro Phi Beta.” For those of you not in-the-know, when I was in college, I founded the Beta Zeta chapter of Phi Beta Fraternity at Berklee College of Music. I’m not sure if the chapter is still active. Sadly, I don’t think it is, but it tickles me to think of all the amazing women I’ve met through Phi Beta who fit this song. I also am amused by the idea of using a lightning bolt as a Greek letter.

happymonday

I wonder if that means folks with HIV get osteoperosis less frequently…

Folks with HIV get MS less frequently than average folks.

hivScientists from the Albion Centre at the Prince of Wales Hospital in Sydney, Australia have found that patients with HIV are 62% less likely to develop MS, compared with control patients. It doesn’t end there, though — it appears that the longer someone has been diagnosed with HIV, the lower their risk of MS. This finding has scientists excited about the possibility of treating MS with antiretroviral therapy that is currently in use for patients with HIV.

There are a few reasons that people with HIV might be more resistant to developing MS. The first is pretty obvious: HIV destroys your immune system. Your immune system can’t very well get on with the job of destroying your nervous system if it’s being eradicated. Suppression of the immune system is one of the primary functions of many current treatments for MS, such as Gilenya and Tecfidera.

The second reason is less obvious. There is a theory out there that multiple sclerosis may be triggered by infectious or viral agents, such as the Epstein-Barr virus or herpesvirus 6. If this theory is accurate, it completely makes sense that antiretroviral therapy would have a positive effect on the course of the disease.

Watch out for Osteoperosis!

osteoporosisAlso in MS news today is the finding that folks with MS end up with osteoperosis more frequently than folks who don’t have MS. This makes sense, since both diseases share risk factors (age, history, family history, race, gender, inactivity, low vitamin D levels, smoking), and steroid treatments for MS negatively affect bone density.

What can you do, if you have MS, to help avoid osteoperosis? Increase calcium and vitamin D intake, avoid smoking and excessive alcohol intake, and regularly exercise.

And now, time for some Awesome.

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Three Great Things About Yesterday

  1. Had 4 seizures while on the treadmill at the gym – kept walking through all of them. Adam said, when he caught me at #4 (The others were simple partial facial seizures.) that he thought it was hilarious that I was still walking. I just kept thinking over and over again “Just keep going.”  Well, sometimes you can’t… but having someone there to catch you is great.
  2. Got to wear my new, pretty, purple cross-trainers. Yay for shoes that make me smile!
  3. Sushi for lunch.

 

Daily Cute

The chirps slay me!

 

Everyday Earbug

Every Monday Deserves Corgis.

Happy Monday!

mondaycorgiToday, I’m trying my best to have a good day and to stop thinking about the fact that today we should hear back from the bank about the house.

Obsessing doesn’t help anything. We either have it or we don’t. Still, the truth is that I’m both excited and scared. Homeownership is both super cool and potentially difficult. I keep thinking about how we’d set the place up, where our furniture would go, and what work we need to do on it… I both keep thinking about how great it’ll be to have our own place with enough rooms that we could have 3 kids and still be comfortable and how incredibly worried I am that we somehow won’t be able to afford it — even though I did the math and know for absolutely certain that it’s in our price range. The fear is totally irrational but intense.

Truth be told, I’ve gotten very comfortable at our current apartment. I like where we live. It’s big enough to not feel cooped-up when you stay there for days on end and small enough that it’s easy to keep clean. I know how to get around here, and I like the gym we go to. All of that might be changing. I honestly think I’m more afraid of the change than anything.

I Want The Crown!

Tomorrow, I have a rare double-neurologist visit. I’m seeing both my MS specialist and seizure doctor at the same time. Usually, I would be excited by this, but I have been lucky — nothing’s really been out of the ordinary for me, recently. I am aware, however, that my “ordinary” is anything but. I know it’s important to keep the doctors in the loop about everything, anyway, and not to sugar coat things just because I’m handling them well.

I don’t know if anyone else does this, but I have a terrible habit of showing up to neurology appointments and smiling through them and saying I’m fine… like I’m auditioning to be a contestant on America’s Happiest Cripple or something. Doing this helps exactly no one. It’s like on some sick, subconscious level, I’m trying to get my doctor to like me. I honestly feel more of an instinctual need to hide my infirmity from them than I do towards anyone else. It’s messed up. The worst thing to hear from a doctor (which I have heard countless times) is, “You’re complicated.” or “Your case is challenging.” I don’t want to be a challenge or a bother. I just want to be better, and for doctors to stop grimacing when they read my chart.

Hello, is there anybody in there?

(Why, yes, I am referencing a Pink Floyd song.) I’ve been feeling kind of lonely recently, and I realized it’s because I’m not really connected with my friends anymore. I mean, we post memes and occasionally chat on Facebook, but there’s rarely deeper conversation.

I started blogging about 12 years ago on a platform called LiveJournal. I made some of the best friends I’ve ever had through that service. Most of them, I still keep up with over Facebook. But I realized, the other day, that I’m really missing the deeper level of communication that comes from sharing your life through blogging, so I re-joined in the hopes that I could regain that closeness with them. I was saddened to find that only 2 of my friends still regularly post there.

I wonder how many of my friends still blog at all, honestly. I only usually read what people cross-post to FB, and that’s not much. I should probably make more of an effort if I genuinely want the deeper relationships that we used to have. That might even mean emailing people directly to see how they’re doing, or, God-forbid, picking up a phone or using Skype to have an actual conversation. (Crazy, right?)

Speaking of making an effort, I have got to get up and get off the computer. If I don’t get dressed and go to the grocery store, we won’t have dinner at a reasonable time tonight, and that would suck. I should also probably eat some lunch, because, you know, eating is a good thing.

BTW — I asked my FB friends for suggestions for delicious weeknight meals, and I got several great recipes. I’ll be sure to hook you up with them tomorrow.

And the Awesomeness

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Three Great Things About Yesterday
I’ve been doing Three Great Things About Yesterday for over a year now, but it’s only just made it to this blog. I have to say, I end up with the best insights on days that, for whatever reason, pretty much sucked. The toughest days to come up with 3 great things for are days like yesterday, where nothing particularly good or bad seemed to happen. It was just relaxing. Still, you gotta look for the good, so here goes nothing.

  1. Accidentally found a kitchy, adorable coffee shop while waiting for a table at the Bongo Room. It was full of 80s movie memorabilia and couches. There was a mock Back to the Future Delorean parked near the ceiling and a replica flux capacitor on the wall. I don’t mind that the coffee is overpriced if I am that amused.
     
  2. Enjoyed a new episode of my favorite soap opera, TrueBlood. (Interestingly enough, the folks at HBO have created a blog that’s “written” by one of the characters on the show. It’s a pretty decent time-waster.)
     
  3. Deeply appreciated spending time relaxing with Adam. Loving that man is my joy.

What made your Sunday special?
 
Daily Cute


Somebody loves his teddybear. ❤
 
Everyday Earbug


I’m really digging this song because it both makes me want to shake my butt and laugh it off. I mean, how can you not be amused by TwerkBot?

entertained

Bang Bang!

30 WHOLE Minutes Without Facebook

fbclosedThe last half hour of my life was illuminating.

At noon EDT, Facebook went down for most of us in the US. All it took was 5 minutes of it not functioning for me to get up, start doing laundry, and finally pour myself some cereal for breakfast. I came back to the computer, and it was still down… so I hopped on Twitter and blamed Hamas for the outage. (Because who else could possibly be responsible? Clearly, it was some terrorist act!) I read through my feed in less than 10 minutes. And then I hopped on G+ and did the same thing.

It’s amazing to me that I can eat breakfast and entirely catch up on 2 social media platforms in 20 minutes, but often stay on Facebook, scrolling through articles and witty shit my friends say for hours. It makes me wonder what it is about that site that has the ability to keep my attention. It must be the conversations.

Annnnnnd SWITCH!

So, I’ve gotten the heads up from GoDaddy that my domain name is fixing to expire in October. They’re trying to convince me to renew 3 months early and pay $14.99/year for the privilege. I wonder how many people are stupid enough to just go along with it. If I transfer my domain name to a different service, I’ll pay about half of that.

This has me thinking: I’ve already got web server space at 1and1.com and I also pay WordPress $13 a year for the privilege of using my domain here. This seems like a silly waste of money, especially considering that WordPress puts banner ads at the bottom of my entries, which means they’re actually making money off my blogging. (And I’m not…)

To transfer a .com domain to 1and1 is $7.99 for the first year, $14.99 every year afterward… so essentially, there’s an incentive to transfer your domain to a different service every year. What a pain in the ass!

Awesomeness for August 1, 2014

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3 Great Things About Yesterday

  1. Remember that awesome house I wrote about that Adam and I put a bid on and lost to someone who came in with a cash offer? Well, it turns out that the bank had misrepresented the amount of taxes on the property, since it’s on a double lot — so the deal fell through, and yesterday, the house went back on the market. 🙂 (We put in an offer today!)
  2. 20 minutes of bike riding at the gym with no seizures.
  3. Deep, deep love for the ability to use 5 Hr Energy, Aleve, and Afrin.

Daily Cute
The folks at Animal Planet are pretty much the world’s experts in cute. What’s cuter than baby animals? Cross-species friendships with baby animals.

Hold on tight, here come all the feels.

Everyday Earbug
I love funk & soul music. Have since I was a small kid. I blame the Muppets! Today’s earbug is my favorite modern, girl group jam since the Moulin Rouge remake of Lady Marmalade. I can’t help but dance to this… and for whatever reason, I’ve convinced myself that it’ll end up as one of the songs in the Sims4. It just seems like even AI would want to shake its booty to it.

And Some Good News In The MS Research Dept.

Scientists have generated stem cells from skin samples and turned those stem cells into myelin-builders.

Check it out.

“For the first time, New York Stem Cell Foundation (NYSCF) scientists generated induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells lines from skin samples of patients with primary progressive multiple sclerosis and further, they developed an accelerated protocol to induce these stem cells into becoming oligodendrocytes, the myelin-forming cells of the central nervous system implicated in multiple sclerosis and many other diseases.”

I’m guessing that a treatment based off of this research will be available in the next 10 to 20 years… because science is slow.

happyfriday